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Manure management reduces pollution of Chinas nature: Danish growth counsellors make a difference in China.

01.08.2018  06:51

Second part of new summer series:

Four growth counsellors share the results of government to government projects between Denmark and China, in areas like environment, agriculture, health and food.

Manure destroys China’s groundwater
Farmers who clean stable floors with a water hose in old-fashioned ways, and manure that runs directly from the stable into the nearest water stream is the reality in many parts of China today. The technology level at many farms in China is lacking far behind, and methods that Denmark abandoned more than 60 years ago, are still being used by Chinese farmers today.

In the city of Harbin in northern China, agronomist and growth counsellor on agricultural issues, Tilde Hellsten, is running a manure management project.

Tilde Hellsten, who is sent out by Danish development aid organisation Danida, is inspiring Chinese authorities on how to regulate the dosage and spreading of manure, to prevent it from ending up in nature, streams and groundwater. Trust and a strong network is a crucial part of making the project work, says Tilde Hellsten.

Watch growth advisor Tilde Hellsten explain how the Comprehensive Strategic Partnership between Denmark and China, benefits the environment as well as Danish businesses.

The city of Harbin lacks manure storage tanks and only very few farming communities are using manure spreaders.

“Many Chinese farmers are unaware, that too high concentrations of manure damages the grown water. It is a bit of a task to convince them to invest in new technology and store the manure properly in manure tanks . That is something we are working on” says Tilde Hellsten.

However, the manure project is going so well that new regulations on manure handeling are now ready for implementation in Harbin.

The manure management project is part of the government to government cooperation between Denmark and China. Since 2008, Denmark and China have been had cooperation in areas such as agriculture, health, food and environment.



Second part of new summer series:

Four growth counsellors share the results of government to government projects between Denmark and China, in areas like environment, agriculture, health and food.

Manure destroys China’s groundwater
Farmers who clean stable floors with a water hose in old-fashioned ways, and manure that runs directly from the stable into the nearest water stream is the reality in many parts of China today. The technology level at many farms in China is lacking far behind, and methods that Denmark abandoned more than 60 years ago, are still being used by Chinese farmers today.

In the city of Harbin in northern China, agronomist and growth counsellor on agricultural issues, Tilde Hellsten, is running a manure management project.

Tilde Hellsten, who is sent out by Danish development aid organisation Danida, is inspiring Chinese authorities on how to regulate the dosage and spreading of manure, to prevent it from ending up in nature, streams and groundwater. Trust and a strong network is a crucial part of making the project work, says Tilde Hellsten.

Watch growth advisor Tilde Hellsten explain how the Comprehensive Strategic Partnership between Denmark and China, benefits the environment as well as Danish businesses.

The city of Harbin lacks manure storage tanks and only very few farming communities are using manure spreaders.

“Many Chinese farmers are unaware, that too high concentrations of manure damages the grown water. It is a bit of a task to convince them to invest in new technology and store the manure properly in manure tanks . That is something we are working on” says Tilde Hellsten.

However, the manure project is going so well that new regulations on manure handeling are now ready for implementation in Harbin.

The manure management project is part of the government to government cooperation between Denmark and China. Since 2008, Denmark and China have been had cooperation in areas such as agriculture, health, food and environment.



Second part of new summer series:

Four growth counsellors share the results of government to government projects between Denmark and China, in areas like environment, agriculture, health and food.

Manure destroys China’s groundwater
Farmers who clean stable floors with a water hose in old-fashioned ways, and manure that runs directly from the stable into the nearest water stream is the reality in many parts of China today. The technology level at many farms in China is lacking far behind, and methods that Denmark abandoned more than 60 years ago, are still being used by Chinese farmers today.

In the city of Harbin in northern China, agronomist and growth counsellor on agricultural issues, Tilde Hellsten, is running a manure management project.

Tilde Hellsten, who is sent out by Danish development aid organisation Danida, is inspiring Chinese authorities on how to regulate the dosage and spreading of manure, to prevent it from ending up in nature, streams and groundwater. Trust and a strong network is a crucial part of making the project work, says Tilde Hellsten.

Watch growth advisor Tilde Hellsten explain how the Comprehensive Strategic Partnership between Denmark and China, benefits the environment as well as Danish businesses.

The city of Harbin lacks manure storage tanks and only very few farming communities are using manure spreaders.

“Many Chinese farmers are unaware, that too high concentrations of manure damages the grown water. It is a bit of a task to convince them to invest in new technology and store the manure properly in manure tanks . That is something we are working on” says Tilde Hellsten.

However, the manure project is going so well that new regulations on manure handeling are now ready for implementation in Harbin.

The manure management project is part of the government to government cooperation between Denmark and China. Since 2008, Denmark and China have been had cooperation in areas such as agriculture, health, food and environment.